Red meat consumption linked to invasive breast cancer risk

Red meat consumption linked to invasive  breast cancer risk

Lo JJ, et al evidenced a potential risk of invasive breast cancer with increased consumption of red meat. The researchers examined the association between the consumption of different types of meat, meat mutagens and incident invasive breast cancer. 42,012 participants were involved in the study. Exposure to meat type and meat mutagens was calculated, and associations with invasive breast cancer risk were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. During follow-up (mean, 7.6 years), 1,536 invasive breast cancers were diagnosed at least 1 year after enrolment. Increasing consumption of red meat was associated with increased risk of invasive breast cancer (HR highest vs. lowest quartile:1.23, 95% CI: 1.02–1.48, p trend = 0.01). Conversely, increasing consumption of poultry was associated with decreased invasive breast cancer risk (HR highest vs. lowest quartile: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.72–1.00; p trend = 0.03). In a substitution model with combined red meat and poultry consumption held constant, substituting poultry for red meat was associated with decreased invasive breast cancer risk (HR highest vs. lowest quartile of poultry consumption: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58–0.89). No associations were observed for cooking practices, estimated heterocyclic amines or heme iron from red meat consumption with breast cancer risk. The researchers suggest that substituting poultry for red meat could reduce breast cancer risk.

Source: International Journal of Cancer 06 August 2019 https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32547

Straight Talk

View More